What Types of Colleges Are Out There

Every year, a new group of high school students move towards graduation and start thinking about college. So, what types of colleges are out there, and how do you choose which one is right for you?

There are many possibilities when it comes to choosing a college, and the choice can often feel daunting. Narrowing the possibilities down can help; for example, for some students location will be a defining factor in their choice – they may be looking to stay at home and will need a local college. For others, finance will help with the decision; public colleges are usually cheaper than private ones. Having an interest in a specialism helps with narrowing the choice. An interest in a specific subject will allow the student to choose the right type of college that will excel in their chosen field.

For some high school students, a final decision on what they will major in is not determined until they are at Amherst college. They may, however, have noticed that they favor certain areas, or have an aptitude for a specific subject.

The following list of college types may be helpful in narrowing down their choice. These institutions are defined as special focus institutions, as they offer a majority of their programs in specific areas.

  • Theological seminaries, Bible colleges, and faith-related institutions offer a number of degrees that prepare people for the practice of ministry, research and and/or teaching in the area of theology.
  • Medical schools/centers are the choice for those who are looking for a career in medicine, usually as doctors.
  • Health Profession Schools are the ideal choice for those seeking careers in other health professions such as dentistry or nursing, to name but a few.
  • Schools of Engineering offer courses in subjects such as mechanical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering and chemical engineering.
  • Schools of Business and Management offer courses in various areas of business, including insurance, finance, accounting and entrepreneurship programs.
  • Schools of Art, Music, and Design, as one would assume, offer courses in art, design and music studies.
  • Schools of Law are ideal for budding lawyers, the courses available at many include programs such as international law, law and business as well as the standard LLB.
  • If after having looked at the above list, nothing jumps out, Liberal Arts may be the ideal. Lib Arts institutes allow students to develop their general intellectual capacity in a wide range of disciplines such as life sciences, literature, languages, history or mathematics.

Whatever the college type you choose, the journey through this part of your education offers the opportunity for you to find out who you really are, and what you want to do. You may find, as many do, that your final career choice relates only marginally to your chosen university program, if at all. The Federal Bank of New York released data that showed that only 27 % of graduates have a job that mirrors their chose of college major.

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References:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2013/05/20/only-27-percent-of-college-grads-have-a-job-related-to-their-major/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carnegie_Classification_of_Institutions_of_Higher_Education

http://www.usnews.com/education/best-colleges/right-school/choices